Backyard Chickens Filling Up Animal Shelters

July 8, 2013

Backyard chickens dumped at shelters when hipsters can’t cope, critics say

Despite the dubious use of “hipster” in the title to grab views, this is actually an important article. It’s far more than the downwardly mobile children of baby boomers who are contributing to an influx of unwanted hens and roosters in local shelters. And that’s just the best case scenario. A dozen chickens who never produced any eggs because they were too stressed out and sick are a regular feature in the craigslist “free” section in any major city.

Image

Debeaked and discarded…she’s whose responsibility?

The growing interest many people have in producing their own food is laudable. Achieving food sovereignty from the massive agribusiness corporations that have contaminated our food supply with pesticides, herbicides and hormones is clearly an order of the day. Backyard chickens, however, are the wrong way forward. Not only are they typically purchased from the very same factory farms that exist as a moral stain on our collective conscience but most would-be egg collectors are unprepared for the amount of work and the cost of keeping them healthy.

The fact is, most people who want back yard chickens don’t really want back yard chickens. What they really want is free eggs. In order to get the eggs, however, chickens need to be forced to bioaccumulate calories that humans then harvest without the bird’s consent. Whatever sort of “misplaced rural nostalgia” or feigned emotional connections are grafted onto this process, it is an inherently coercive one.

There are ethical ways to procure chickens. To rescue an animal and offer them sanctuary on land you control is a kind and proper thing to do. In the case of rescued chickens, you might even get a few eggs out of it. But if what you’re looking for is a servant to feed you and then discard when she is no longer useful, you’re just reproducing the same violent and coercive relationships that are the order of the day. So do us all a favor: save the chickens, kill the nostalgia and grow some kale instead.


James McWilliams: What’s Being Butchered Here is Logic

May 27, 2011

James McWilliams’ recent piece in The Atlantic has been making the online rounds recently. I read it this morning and thought he highlighted a few interesting points about nonhuman animals that often get passed over when people are discussing sustainability and food production. Namely, McWilliams discusses the ways in which Darwinism problematized the binary human/nonhuman paradigm which, for a stone age throwback, still gets a lot of play in certain quarters.

When humans and non-human animals are part of a continuum, rather than qualitatively distinct forms of life, human meat-eaters confront a serious quandary. It becomes incumbent upon us to forge a contemporary justification for carnivorous behavior. Aristotle and Genesis will no longer do. By undermining the long-held basis of inherent human superiority over non-human animals, the science of evolution obliterated the framework within which thoughtful carnivores long justified their behavior. As it now stands, human meat-eaters, unless they reject modern science, support the killing of non-human animals without the slightest intellectual or ethical grounding.

I can’t say I’m a fan of foodie-ism as it pertains to real solutions for the problem of food production, distribution and sustainability. It rankles just a little bit to see people turning food into an expensive hobby when you know that over a billion humans worldwide are starving, to say less of the 45 billion nonhumans being murdered every year for a nutritional need that does not exist. I’m glad that there seems to be a consciousness shift away from CAFOs and industrial monocultures, but sometimes well-meaning people can be frustratingly blind to matters of class or species privilege. Food is not a toy. We live and die by it. Or, as Josh Harper put it: “reading a Michael Pollan book doesn’t excuse you (or him) from having to consider the lives you are taking and the suffering you contribute to.”